Annual Portfolio Review 2020

Annual Portfolio Review 2020

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6 Responses

  1. Avatar Al Cam says:

    A couple of quick Q’s if I may:
    1) are you using CPIH (Sept – Sept) as your annual inflation measure now?
    2) have you had a change of heart re Fidelity and/or iWeb, and if so why?
    Thanks

    • Mike Rawson Mike Rawson says:

      Hi Al,

      1) I try to publish in the first week of Jan and I just use the latest data available. I’m not sure why I couldn’t find the November CPIH figure (or even the October one) when I was writing the post. Some other stats are delayed by Covid, compared to 2019 (eg. house prices), so I probably found it easier to accept the stale number.

      I’ll put the revised number in the underlying spreadsheet so that we catch up next year, but I can’t be bothered to reprint the charts for a 0.1% error in my favour.

      2) I never went off iWeb, it’s just that the X-O accounts have done better over the last year, and I’m currently putting my ISA money into T212.

      I have changed my mind about Fidelity as the “new” SIPP that I have been transferred to is easy to manage and very cheap for a core portfolio.

      I’ve also changed my mind about PensionBee (which underperformed badly this year) and might move that account over to Fidelity.

      Mike

      • Avatar Al Cam says:

        Thanks for the prompt reply.
        Re 1) OK – I asked because a lot of DB’s and Govt Depts use Sept to Sept inflation measure.

        The snowball updates are a good addition too.

        And, of course, all the best for 2021!

  2. Avatar John says:

    Thanks for such deep analysis. I wondered whether you had invested in bonds directly? And if so – how you would go about this?

    • Mike Rawson Mike Rawson says:

      Not really – I have DB pensions and cash instead, plus a tiny amount (less than 1%) of OEIC bond funds in my legacy accounts. I wouldn’t personally be looking to buy bonds right now as I expect inflation and interest rate rises.

      Buying bonds direct is hard at private investor deal sizes. You can look at the ORB (Order Book for Retail Bonds) on the LSE, or at a service like Wise Alpha, which lets you buy slices of bonds. But you are probably better off with ETFs.

  1. January 7, 2021

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Annual Portfolio Review 2020

by Mike Rawson time to read: 4 min
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